Also Known As: Levacetylmethadol, Orlaam, levomethadyl acetate

Levacetylmethadol (INN), levomethadyl acetate (USAN), Orlaam (trade name) or levo-α-acetylmethadol (LAAM) is a synthetic opioid similar in structure to methadone. It has a long duration of action due to its active metabolites. It was approved in 1993 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of opioid dependence. In 2001, Orlaam was removed from the European market due to reports of life threatening ventricular rhythm disorders. In 2003, Roxane Laboratories, Inc. discontinued Orlaam in the US.

LAAM is indicated as a second-line treatment for the treatment and management of opioid dependence if patients fail to respond to drugs like methadone or buprenorphine. Before August 1993, LAAM was classified as a schedule I drug in the United States. LAAM is not approved for use in Canada.

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