Also Known As: Milrinone, Primacor

Milrinone, commonly known and marketed under the brand name Primacor, is a medication used in patients who have heart failure. It is a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor that works to increase the heart's contractility and decrease pulmonary vascular resistance. Milrinone also works to vasodilate which helps alleviate increased pressures (afterload) on the heart, thus improving its pumping action. While it has been used in people with heart failure for many years, recent studies suggest that milrinone may exhibit some negative side effects that have caused some debate about its use clinically.[1][2]

Overall, milrinone supports ventricular functioning of the heart by decreasing the degradation of cAMP and thus increasing phosphorylation levels of many components in the heart that contribute to contractility and heart rate. Milrinone use following cardiac surgery has been under some debate because of the potential increase risk of postoperative atrial arrhythmias.[3] However, in the short term milrinone has been deemed beneficial to those experiencing heart failure and an effective therapy to maintain heart function following cardiac surgeries. There is no evidence of any long term beneficial effects on survival.[4] In critically ill patients with evidence of cardiac dysfunction there is limited good quality evidence to recommend its use.[5]

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