Dry Skin

Also Known As: Dry Skin, Xeroderma, Xerodermia, Flaking skin

Xeroderma or xerodermia, derived from the Greek words for "dry skin," is a condition involving the integumentary system, which in most cases can safely be treated with emollients and/or moisturizers. Xeroderma occurs most commonly on the scalp, lower legsarms, the knuckles, the sides of the abdomen and thighs. Symptoms most associated with xeroderma are scaling (the visible peeling of the outer skin layer), itching and skin cracking.[1]

Xeroderma is a very common condition. It happens more often in the winter where the cold air outside and the hot air inside creates a low relative humidity. This causes the skin to lose moisture and it may crack and peel. Bathing or hand washingtoo frequently, especially if one is using harsh soaps, may also contribute to xeroderma. Xeroderma can also be caused by a deficiency of vitamin Avitamin D,systemic illness, severe sunburn, or some medication.[2] Xeroderma can also be caused by choline inhibitorsDetergents like washing powder and washing up liquid can also cause xeroderma.

Print this Page

All Treatments

Average Effectiveness

This is the Average effectiveness per ailment as reported by our participants (you).

  • 0 = No improvement or Worse
  • 1 = Slight improvement
  • 2 = Moderate Improvement
  • 3 = Significant Improvement
  • 4 = Cured

Order By

Type of Treatment

Date Range

Minimum Number of Users

Complete a survey on Dry Skin to help the CureCrowd community

If you have tried to treat this ailment, please complete the following form to help us better our data, and help guide people to the best possible treatments. CureCrowd is a public resource with absolutely no vested interest in the outcomes of our studies.